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GENEALOGY COLLECTION ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 3 1833 00855 1753 GENEALOGY 942,4501 SH84T 1892 Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2014 https://archive.org/details/transactionsofsh24shro TRANSACTIONS OK THE SHROPSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY. 14 2 2 7 0 SHROPSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY. In 107G, a council held at Winchester decreed that those secular clergy who had wives might keep them, but forbad those who had not to marry.

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Julian's, over its own parochial area only, and soon to be lost, but still existing and extending over six other churches ; that, before the Reformation, assemblies of great and even national importance wero held within its walls, as in the reigns of Henry III. Auden proposed a vote of thanks to the Archdeacon for his very able address, and said as the incumbent of St. The mist having cleared away to some extent, the members were better able to enjoy their walk, noticing on their way plants of Genista tinctoria, growing in abundance, and making acquaintance with a family of young lap wings too recently hatched to have learnt to be afraid of mankind. After the Conquest, Earl Uoger de Montgomery bestowed five hides of land of St.

And besides its dedication pointing, as I think, to British times, there is its position within the old town, and the pro- bability that more than one church existed within it in the British days, and the absence, too, of any tradition as to its foundation points to, or at least admits, an early period, (x.) We have now but one church left, of the history of which, however, very little is known ; but concerning which much may be gathered from the circumstances attaching to it — 1 mean S. I think that I have proved with regard to eight of the ten churches that no one of them can possibly have been the earliest, unless we suppose that Christianity in Shrewsbury did not survive the departure of the Romans. Julian's, 1 have said, may possibly, nay probably, have belouged to the British Church, by reason both of its site and its dedication ; but both by reason of its dedication and its site it must yield in priority of foundation to S. Rope and Miss Hawkins ; that a peculiar jurisdiction had been assigned to it from the days of King Edgar, not extending, as a similar right once diil at S. Dkinkwatek seconded, and hoped the Archdeacon's paper was merely the first chapter in the history of St. It was all too soon time to return to the carriages at XVII Astou Aer, to rejoin the less hardy of the party who had not ventured on the walk. Morville was a collegiate church in Saxon times, possessing eight canons, and endowed with eight hides of land.

Bulkeley-Owen 1, 199 The Last Visitation of Shropshire, 1663. We still find in Wales a great number of saints belonging to the list of martyrs in the far East and South, whose names were honoured in the dedication of churches from the earliest introduction of the faith into this island. Mary is beyond all doubt the most common among the Britons. By such conjecture we should have three churches founded in the old town before the Anglo Saxon invasion, and the extension of the Mercian kiugdom to Offa's Dyke. Mary's Church, in the very centre of the earlier town, and when parishes came to be defined, occupying in its cure of souls more than half the town area, and with a burial ground extending, at one time, from the centre line of Castle Street to the very doors of the houses now occupied by Mr. The vote was carried unanimously, and the Archdeacon having replied, the nieeting terminated. This annual excursion of the Shropshire Areha)logical and Natural History Society took place on Tuesday, June 28th, in the neighbour- hood of Bridgnorth. It is now, unfor- tunately falling into ruin, but still contains several ornamental ceilings, on which the device of the Prince of Wales' feather is fre- quently repeated. Lhigcn, Esq., Four Sisters, East Bergholt, Suffolk Burton, Rev. Lingen, Little Aston Vicarage, Sutton Cold-field, Suffolk Calco.tt, John, Es(]., Oakley Street, Shrewsbury Calvert, E., Esq., LL.

Extracted from the Shrewsbury Corporation Muniments by the Rev. It is quite impossible fur me to go fully into the proof of this assertion now, but 1 do not hesitate to make it. It is not at all likely to have been introduced by the Anglo Saxons, who rarely used other than Scripture names. Chad is it likely that the dean and canons of the larger and more powerful foundation would have suffered so large a portion of the town, so closely adjoin- ing them, to be severed from their control. Juliana was an early saint of Asia Minor, at the very beginning of the 4th century, and though unlikely to have been chosen by the Anglo Saxons not at all unlikely to have been respected by the Britons. Andrew, arc the commonest of all Anglo* Xlll Saxon dedications, S. Llanfair and Llanfihangel are, I suppose, the most frequent titles at this day in Wales, and Llanyelian is not likely to have been set up until after the title Llanfair had been appropriated. Michael in the Castle may have been of British nomination, too. Many of the rooms contain oak panelling of a somewhat later date, and one upstairs room, known as the " chapel," has remarkably fine oak beams. The latter is a most picturesque turreted brick building, traditionally said to date from a visit paid to Upton Cressett by Prince Henry, the elder son of James I., when" he was holding his court at Ludlow.

Bird 59 Letter from the Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield to the Bailiffs of Shrewsbury concerning the Cure of Nesse, 1568. There must therefore have been churches in it, of which S. 1 Xll think that we may fairly maintain, in the new light shed on the British and Anglo-Saxon period, that Christianity, though stamped out by the Saxon invader over a great part of the island after the close of the ltoman occupation, yet never disappeared from Shrews- bury, nor i Ddced from the greater part of Shropshire. It is said to have been built where the Lys or palace of the Welsh Prince Ntood, ami so did not succeed any earlier church. 1 suppose that it is now an accepted statement that the old British town was bounded, after the manner of the Britons, by a wall of earth and stone, and a ditch, and that these ran from the castle along the west side of the hill to the bottom of Bride-hill, then across to the top of the Wyle-cop, and then returned to the castle along the east edge of the hill; that the town ditch or bailey ran along High-street ; that a pool existed south of it, where now lies the Market-place ; and that no part of S. What churches had the inhabitants in the British days 1 I suggest that there were at least three, of which two survive, (ix.) One of these was in all likelihood S. It is a very rare one in England, if indeed any other exists. From the church a move was made to the manor house, an excellent specimen of Elizabethan brickwork, mainly of the time of Richard Cressett, who was Sheriff in 1583. Thursby Pelham, Vicar of Cound, whose family represents the Cressetts, kindly pointed out the objects of interest in the house and the gateway house.

There can be no doubt, I think, whatever, that the town was Christian while the Welsh Princes held it : and that the Mercian kings had becomo Christian before they entered it. I con- jecture this partly from its singular dedication. The pulpit and the old communion table are of oak, and date apparently from the 17th century.

Among the country people whocome only occasionally to the town I find that this superstition has not wholly died out. Chad's has indeed been since its foundation one of the chief churches of Shrewsbury there can be no doubt, but that it cannot have been the mother church is clear for the following reasons : — S. This was about a century before Shrewsbury passed out of the hands of the Welsh Princes into those of the Mercians, and we cannot place the foundation of S. Well, then, wus Shrewsbury at that time a Christian town or not? In the Cressett Chapel, now used as a vestry, is a mural brass to the memory of Richard Cressett and his wife, 1640.

Chad's ; and the sexton who had custody of its key held the most profitable ollice of its kind in Shrews- bury. The arcade of the now destroyed north aisle is apparently of curly Kith century work.

If, in the earlier part of this century, people came to see Shrewsbury, they went first to St. The party first made their way to the church, where they were met by the Vicar, the Rev. The first mention of a church here is in 1259, when William de Upton, lord of Upton, had a dispute with Richard Foliot, rector of Chetton, as to the right of presenta- tion.

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