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William Doxford Page 1, page bottom (turret & whaleback vessels). It would seem that William Doxford and Sons, Limited was established by one William Doxford (1812-1882) in 1840, building wooden boats at Coxgreen (there are a great many references to 'Cox Green' but while Cox Green was correct (a train ticket is here), I understand 'Coxgreen' is correct today), some way upstream from the centre of Sunderland. Elihu Thompson found Elm Branch & tried, unsuccessfully, to tow her to port, but her tow hawser separated. Per 1 (Norwegian page, image, English translation), 2 (data & image, Stiklestad (1), 50% down), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access).

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It moved its facilities downstream on the River Wear to Pallion in 1857. She did, however, raise the general alarm as to Elm Branch's predicament. It was a 'Puget Sound Tugboat Company' tug however, Tyee I believe, one of two tugs (Tacoma was the other) that attended the scene, that brought Elm Branch safely to Seattle, being later awarded $8,500 for her efforts by a Seattle court. 1919 the vessel was sold to to Polish-American Navigation Corp.', of New York, & renamed Wisla. Borrowstounness, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to be broken up.

Pallion, is, I understand, upstream of the present rail & road bridges in central Sunderland, the shipbuilding yard being located (or I should say located since all shipbuilding ended there in 1988) on the south side of the river close to (west of) the Queen Alexandra Bridge - about 3 miles from the mouth of the river. A series of later sales one after the other - in 1922 to Wisla Steamship Corp., of New York, in 1923 to Wabash Steamship Corp., also of New York or maybe of Delaware. And then, in 1924, to 'Jensen Linien Aktieselskab', (H. Evans & Co., of London, & renamed Purley Beeches - though there may have been a sale ahead of that one, to 'D/S Codan'. Gethring, of Aberavon, was her captain for a number of years from Ellen Jensen thru to Purley Beeches.

A larger site there was purchased, I read, in 1870, known as the 'West Yard'. 1, 1895), 2 (Nautilus, Elm Branch), 3 (1899 loss of propeller), 4 (Polish-American, Wisla), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Jensen), of Copenhagen, Denmark, & renamed Ellen Jensen.

I should mention, however, that the Queen Alexandra Bridge was not there in 1870. Do read the most interesting information available here, (the website of George H. 103.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 340 ft., speed?

Graham of Tulsa, Oklahoma) and the many pages available at the 'Doxford Engine Friends Association' website, available through this page. , signal letters (as Ellen Jensen) NFRJ, accommodation for 3 passengers.

I do not know the name of the business when it was first established - maybe just 'William Doxford'?

Mainly from that first website we learn that William Theodore Doxford (1841-1916) & his brother Alfred (1842-1895) joined their father in the shipbuilding business & that both were partners by 1875.

Perhaps at that point the company would have become 'W. Robert (1851-1932) & Charles (1856-1935), two younger sons also followed into the firm. ) states that the vessel was then owned by 'Mac Kenzie & Mann' of Montreal (I had read that in 1907, the vessel was owned by Canadian Lake & Ocean Navigation Co.

Business must have been good, because, & I quote, 'several times the Doxfords extended their premises'. ) that in 1891 the business became a limited liability company with a capital of 200,000, all owned by the Doxford family. 1, 1891 'William Doxford and Sons Ltd.' was registered as a public company to acquire the family limited company & its business of iron ship builders and marine engineers. In 1893, Doxford launched its first 'Turret Ship', designed with the objective of saving on canal & harbour dues & financed 50/50 with ship owner William Peterson. The upper deck area was reduced to a minimum, the net tonnage was reduced & the cargo area was increased. The vessel was too long to be able to transit the St. Ltd., a subsidiary of 'Mackenzie & Mann', & chartered to 'Inverness Railway and Coal Company' of Port Hastings).

I read that Lloyd's was initially not happy that the vessel was seaworthy, but the design proved in practice to be both seaworthy & a considerable commercial success, so long as the fee computation rules remained. Lawrence & Welland canals without being 'cut down' in size. 2, 1906, (then registered at Newcastle), the vessel ran into one of the worst storms ever in the Gulf of St. Turret Bell, en route from Montreal to Port Hastings, Cape Breton, to load a cargo of coal, was driven ashore at Cable Head, St. She ended up upright, 150 yards offshore, on a rocky ledge. 11, 1917, when en route from Bilbao, Spain, to Hartlepool with a cargo of iron ore, Kwasind hit a German mine, laid by German minelaying submarine UC-4, off the E. Have read near Southwold, Suffolk but have also read near Southend, Essex, both U.

176 (or maybe 177) 'turret ships' (one authoritative site says 184) were built by Doxford in the years through to 1911. The storm continued to rage & the ship was soon driven inland to just 20 yards from the shore.

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