Dating a borderline personality

In this age of dynamic information, there is often a strange dichotomy framing mental health.Access to lived examples via blogs and social media means people are chipping away at stigmas every day.On the other, more chilling hand, a constant feed of experiences means interpretations of illness can be easily warped.

Despite what these sites want you to believe, mental health disorders are not pretty, decorative, or glamorous.

And if there’s any condition that really drives this home, it’s Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), which takes the shittiest parts of being mentally unwell and runs a marathon with them.

If you’re looking for a condition that blends anxiety, depression, OCD, disordered eating, anger issues, and more into the world’s least appealing smoothie, BPD is for you.

Having BPD is like living in a bubble floating in a hazy world of detachment.

You know the bubble is going to pop; the real fun is in never knowing when or why.

The central issue is that BPD is based around feelings.

More specifically, people who are living with it experience emotions a lot more strongly than people who don’t. Bone-aching fury when your clothes horse doesn’t open, so you throw it at the wall, which makes a hole you never get around to filling in.

If that sounds intractable, it’s because it really is. Or intense sensitivity to criticism, like when you don’t receive the mark you want for a university essay, so you accept a full-time job on the other side of the country, starting immediately. Here’s another fun game—try guessing how these situations go down when you’re dating.

BPD in Pop Culture While there are few apt, direct portrayals of BPD in broad society, representations manage to creep into common consciousness through TV, film, and music, leaving the public, at least subconsciously, more aware of the disorder than they may realize.

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