swinger dating com - Carbon dating machine

Scientists at the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies use a Low Energy Plasma Radiocarbon Sampling device on a sample of gelatin at its lab near Santa Fe.

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Carbon dating machine

Marvin Rowe, a scientist at the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies, adjusts the Low Energy Plasma Radiocarbon Sampling device he built to date artifacts with minimal damage.

(Eddie Moore/Albuquerque Journal) “We call the process Low Energy Plasma Radiocarbon Sampling,” said New Mexico’s state archeologist Eric Blinman, who credits Rowe with inventing the process.

“But a lot of people just refer to this as ‘Marvin’s Machine.’” The process is important because, unlike other methods of radiocarbon dating that destroy the sample being tested, LEPRS preserves it.

It also works on tiny samples – even a flake of ink or paint – and is considered a more accurate means of dating.

“With standard radiocarbon dating, there’s a risk of contamination of carbonates.

They have to use acids and, within that process, you lose a large part of your sample and you destroy it,” Blinman explained.

“But we now have the ability to date incredibly small amounts of carbon – 40-100 millionths of a gram – and that is the real revolutionary aspect of this.

And the ancillary part of that is it’s non-destructive.” That’s important to Nancy Akins, a research associate with the Office of Archaeological Studies, who in February was having a bison tooth and sheep bone tested by “Marvin’s Machine.” The items were excavated from the site of a rock shelter in Coyote Canyon north of Mora.

“It could be 500 years old or it could be 5,000 years old,” she said of the bison tooth, the result allowing her to complete her report of the site that she’s determined to have been used by humans as a hunting outpost starting 1,700 years ago.

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