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That's the suggestion from a number of studies on its use as a treatment for conditions as varied as cancer, diarrhoea and diabetes.

In the latest research published last week, a Swedish team reported that the sizes of bladder tumours were reduced just five days after patients were injected with a breast milk compound.

The team at Gothenburg University had been looking at the antibiotic properties of breast milk when a researcher noticed that cancerous lung cells in a test tube died on contact with breast milk.

They then isolated the key compound - a protein called alpha-lactalbumin.

Subsequent tests showed the compound becomes lethal only when exposed to acid, as it is in the stomach, so the scientists mixed it with oleic acid, which is found in babies' stomachs, to form a compound they call HAMLET (human alphalactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells).

The Swedish team, led by Professor Catharina Svanborg, have shown that HAMLET attacks cancer cells, causing apoptosis - a form of cell suicide - in 40 kinds of tumour.

Studies with rats showed that after just seven weeks a highly invasive brain cancer called glioblastoma was seven times smaller in those treated with HAMLET.

The product has also been made into a cream and tested on warts (which share the same growth properties as tumours) and found to reduce their size by 75 per cent in 20 volunteers.

Researchers believe this could have implications for the treatment of cervical cancer, which is linked to the human papilloma virus, or HPV.

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